Posts in Category: Urban

The crow stops here

A crow atop a STOP sign on The Grand Parade, Cork.

Shot using a fairly high ISO but bicubic resizing smudges the noise away!

Trust on the street

Have you ever thought about how you’re manipulated by the brands?

Trust Boots.

Parked Motorbikes

Two motorbikes parked on the South Mall attracted my attention especially as a strong sun reflected off the clean chrome.

Yes, I know there’s a weird diagonal, yes it is distracting. Yes, it is intentional. Enjoy!

St. Anne’s Church Tower

The Shandon bell tower of St. Anne’s Church is one of the most recognisable sights around Cork. Here it is viewed from the end of Academy Street by Patrick’s Street.

The Irish Tricolour

The Irish Flag, or Tricolour hangs outside the Muskerry Arms Pub in Blarney. More here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flag_of_Ireland

The beautiful weather recently provided a perfect opportunity to shoot outside. Yay!

Sitting around at the GPO

Teens sit around on the limestone blocks on Oliver Plunkett Street, Cork. That’s the Post Office in the background and the infamous Hi-B Bar to the left where you can be thrown out or verbally abused if the eccentric owner doesn’t like the look of you!

Redhead on the street

A young woman on Patrick Street relaxes for a moment with her fruit smoothy.

Denis MacSweeney

One of the few photography shops left in Cork City center, Denis MacSweeney’s shop in Merchant’s Quay is a simple photo development outfit. O’Leary’s Camera World and MacSweeney’s on Oliver Plunkett St. will sell you cameras and all sorts of other photography bits. Unfortunately both shops were out of 77mm filters the last few times I called in.

Are you off to Dingle then?

One of the more hair-brained ideas of Eamon O Cuiv, the Minister for Community, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs was to proclaim that the official names of all towns in Gaeltacht areas would be the Irish names.
I’m all for efforts to make Irish more appealing and stronger but what was he smoking when he came up with this? All the road signs to towns and villages in Gaeltacht areas now only show the Irish names. Even Irish visitors who frequent the areas have trouble matching road signs to their maps. Who knew that Ballydavid was Baile na nGall for instance?

The good people of Dingle took matters into their own hands by stencilling the English name of their town under "An Daingean" on most road signs, restoring them to their original state. I only saw a couple of signs that hadn’t been modified and those were well out of reach.

I wonder will Minister O Cuiv change his name to O Caoimh as a show of solidarity with the people of Kerry?

(No, he’s not a relation, despite the fact that our surnames sound the same!)