Deep Water Berth at Ringaskiddy

Deep Water Berth at Ringaskiddy

The deep water berth at Ringaskiddy in Cork Harbour yesterday. Driving rain, wind blowing it almost horizontal. The first day of the year was wet. I waited until it quietened down a bit before venturing outside with my camera! :)

Aperture ƒ/8
Camera Canon EOS 6D
Focal length 24mm
ISO 100
Shutter speed 1.3s

The Stars of Cork are Glowing

The Stars of Cork are Glowing

Here’s another shot of the ferris wheel and the lights of Cork City along the River Lee from earlier this month. It’s taken from a location near where I shot my previous Glow photo. I prefer this one however, the colours are more saturated, the starlike effect is enhanced and the angle is more interesting. What do you think?

An Garda

An Garda

A member of An Garda Síochána directed traffic in Blarney last night when Santa visited and the lights were turned on in the village.

This is a long exposure zoomed shot, of about one second duration with the flash firing at the end of the exposure.

To replicate:

  • Make sure you set your flash to “second curtain”. Use Google to find out how on your brand of flash. Normally the flash will fire at the start of an exposure.
  • Have the lens at it’s widest zoom.
  • Set the camera to one second exposure in shutter priority mode (Tv on Canon cameras, S on others) or use manual mode with an aperture as wide as possible.
  • Line up your subject, hit the shutter button and slowly zoom in.

If you’ve timed it right the flash will fire when you’re zoomed in right. They’ll be lit by the flash and any background lights will appear as streaks going towards them. It’s hard to get right and not overexpose your subject so keep practising!

Aperture ƒ/13
Camera Canon EOS 6D
Focal length 20mm
ISO 100
Shutter speed 1s

Coburg Street Lights

Coburg Street Lights

The lights of Coburg Street and passing cars in a long exposure shot of the street from the traffic lights at the junction with Bridge Street.

This was a 15 second exposure at f/22. The lovely star shape of the street lights is because the opening in the lens was so small (at f/22) and the diaphragms of my lens. It takes a long time to get the exposure but it’s worth it!

This appears to be a beautiful example of Fraunhofer diffraction. It is due to the wave nature of light. The effect depends on the wavelength (that is, the color). It is most pronounced when bright light from a practically infinite distance passes through narrow slits, causing the light to spread perpendicular to the slits. This spreads a point-like beam of light into a pair of streaks.

Using a small aperture creates slit-like situations at the corners formed by adjacent blades. Thus, when you have a combination of relatively intense, pointlike, monochromatic light sources in the image and a narrow aperture, you should see a streak (of the same color) emanating from the points in two directions perpendicular to the blades…

…Finally, length of exposure is related to the occurrence of this effect, as you have observed, but only because exposures with bright points of light are almost always made much longer than needed to record the lights: you’re trying to see the rest of the scene, which is much darker. The brightness of the diffraction streaks decreases so rapidly away from their sources that if you used a sufficiently short exposure to properly expose the lights themselves, the streaks would be practically invisible.

Aperture ƒ/22
Camera Canon EOS 6D
Focal length 19mm
ISO 100
Shutter speed 15s

Light Trails on MacCurtain Street

Light Trails on MacCurtain Street

Ghostly light from passing cars hangs in the air on the corner of MacCurtain Street and Bridge Street in Cork City, Ireland.

This is the second of three light trails or light streaks photos I’ll post here in an unintentional series of long exposure photos. The first was my Light Trails in Blarney photo published yesterday.

Aperture ƒ/22
Camera Canon EOS 6D
Focal length 17mm
ISO 100
Shutter speed 8s