Categories
Photography Photos

The Roman Theatre in Malaga

The Roman Theatre in Malaga

Another one of the Roman Theatre. This time a daylight panorama. They don’t take kindly to people using a tripod so just put the camera on one of the steps and rotate it between shots..

Aperture ƒ/8
Camera ILCE-7M3
Focal length 24mm
ISO 64
Shutter speed 1/160s
Categories
Photography Photos

Malaga Panorama

A panorama of Malaga taken from the hills overlooking the city. November 2018.

Aperture ƒ/8
Camera ILCE-7M3
Focal length 105mm
ISO 320
Shutter speed 1/250s
Categories
Ireland Photography Photos

Grianán Ailigh Panorama

Grianán Ailigh, or “Grianán of Aileach” in Co Donegal, Ireland. August 2018.

Aperture ƒ/9
Camera ILCE-7M3
Focal length 28mm
ISO 100
Shutter speed 1/80s
Categories
Ireland Photography Photos

Looking over at Kylemore Abbey

Kylemore Abbey, Co Galway. August 2018.

Aperture ƒ/8
Camera ILCE-7M3
Focal length 28mm
ISO 100
Shutter speed 1/50s
Categories
Black and White Ireland Photography Photos

Clonea Strand on a Cold August Day

Clonea Strand, Co. Waterford. August 2018.

Aperture ƒ/8
Camera ILCE-7M3
Focal length 28mm
ISO 100
Shutter speed 1/250s
Categories
Cork Ireland Photography Photos Urban

The Former Beamish & Crawford Brewery

South Main Street, Cork. September 2017

This is the site of the famous Beamish & Crawford brewery in Cork. Last week it was revealed that a 1000 year old Viking sword had been found there:

A 1,000-year-old, perfectly preserved Viking sword has been discovered by archaeologists at the historic site of the former Beamish and Crawford brewery in Cork city.

The wooden weaver’s sword is a little over 30cm in length, made entirely from yew, and features carved human faces typical of the Ringerike style of Viking art, dating it roughly to the late 11th century.

Consultant Archaeologist Dr Maurice Hurley said it was one of several artefacts of “exceptional significance” unearthed during recent excavations at the South Main Street site, along with intact ground-plans of 19 Viking houses, remnants of central hearths and bedding material.

“For a long time there was a belief that the strongest Viking influence was on Dublin and Waterford, but the full spectrum of evidence shows that Cork was in the same cultural sphere and that its development was very similar,” he said.

“A couple of objects similar to the weaver’s sword have been found in Wood Quay, but nothing of the quality of craftsmanship and preservation of this one,” said Dr Hurley, adding that it was “quite miraculous” how the various wooden items had survived underground in such pristine condition.

“The sword was used probably by women, to hammer threads into place on a loom; the pointed end is for picking up the threads for pattern-making. It’s highly decorated – the Vikings decorated every utilitarian object,” he said.

One of the other artefacts found was a wooden thread-winder carved with two horses’ heads, also associated with fabric weaving.

The Viking remains were found in May, but only came to light last week (Sep 19) following an informal visit to the Cork Public Museum by the Norwegian Ambassador to Ireland, Else Berit Eikeland.

“The visit did not coincide with any official or diplomatic event, but came about due to the Ambassador’s deep personal interest in the Vikings,” said Museum Curator Daniel Breen.

The 8-month archaeological dig led by Dr Hurley finished in June, but developers BAM Ireland have not given any indication yet when building might begin or end at the controversial site.

A spokesperson for BAM said the company had been delighted to be able to facilitate and fully fund the archaeological excavations, thus adding to the medieval heritage of Cork city.

Plans for a 6,000-seat multi-functional events centre at the site have been bedevilled by design changes, delays and massive financial overruns, with current estimates predicting the project could exceed €73 million.

So far, BAM Ireland and its partners Live Nation are set to provide €33 million towards the project, with the government contributing €12 million and Cork City Council €8 million.

Categories
Cork Ireland Photography Photos

Gougane Barra Panorama

Gougane Barra, Cork. October 2016.

Categories
Photography Photos

Mahon Falls Panorama

Mahon Falls, Co Waterford. March 2017.

Categories
Cork Ireland Photography Photos

Kinsale Panorama

A panorama made from several images in Affinity Photo of Kinsale as seen from James Fort.

Aperture ƒ/8
Camera Canon EOS 6D
Focal length 24mm
ISO 100
Shutter speed 1/200s
Categories
Photography Photos

The Victoria & Albert Museum Cafe

The cafe of the Victoria & Albert Museum in London is a stunning room at the back of the building. I photographed it while visiting London with a group of street photographers from Cork yesterday. We were over for the day and packed a whole lot of photography into the hours we had there.

This photo is a panorama made from five photos in Affinity Photo. The room is quite dark so the photos were shot at ISO 12800 and even then the photos at the right side of the room were relatively long 1/25 second exposures!

Aperture ƒ/8
Camera Canon EOS 6D
Focal length 24mm
ISO 12800
Shutter speed 1/30s
Categories
Black and White Cork Ireland Photography Photos Urban

The Skeleton of the Blackrock Terrace

The Blackrock end of Páirc Uí Chaoimh lies exposed as the stadium has been stripped bare in redevelopment of the area.

This is a panorama stitched together by Affinity Photo with final black and white development done in Lightroom. AP did a great job of stitching the images together and I put the healing brush to good use getting rid of distracting foreground walls.

Categories
Black and White Cork Ireland Panoramic Photography Words

Clever panoramas with CleVR

Photocritic found a neat bit of software for displaying panoramic images in a scrollable window. It should make showing them off in a blog much easier.

The beauty of the CleVR system is that the panorama uses Flash instead of Quicktime. Flash is installed on a lot more machines than Quicktime making this more accessible. Unfortunately I think it requires Flash 9 as it didn’t work in Firefox on my Linux desktop. Can anyone else confirm? According to the comments on the post above, the CleVR software is lot easier to use than Quicktime too.

The CleVR software itself is written in Java and loads using the Java Quickstart system. Not everyone will have it installed but it worked fine on my Macbook.

Instead of stitching a few photos together in CleVR, here’s one I made earlier. Much earlier in fact. I made this panorama of Cork City back in 2004 but I never uploaded a high-res version of it anywhere. Now I have. Enjoy!

I would love if the panorama image files were stored on my own server. If CleVR go out of business, or change their site, or something unforseen happens then my panorama is lost. At least with regular images hosted on Flickr, I can simply move them elsewhere and they’ll display fine. Hopefully they’ll address that in the future. They’re not making their money from hosting so they might as well get rid of that cost base.

I’d also love to be able to change the size of the viewing window. I tried changing the embed code but the Flash applet still only displays a 450px wide image. Please, please, please CleVR?