Rijnvelds Early Sensation

Rijnvelds Early Sensation

If you go down to Blarney Castle now you’ll see 30,000 daffodils blooming in the beautiful gardens there. In my last post I joked that the daffodils were confused but it’s a plant that flowers early and tolerates the cold so it’s perfect for this time of year.

Be sure to check out Ferbal O’Callaghan’s beautiful photo of the daffodils too and check out the Friends of Blarney Castle Facebook group where there are more pictures and information.

There’s also the SodShow interview with Paul O’Sullivan and Adam Whitbourn of Blarney Gardens here and here if you want to know more about the gardens there.

Aperture ƒ/8
Camera Canon EOS 6D
Focal length 105mm
ISO 160
Shutter speed 1/160s

Confused Daffodils in Blarney Castle


There are some confused daffodils in Blarney Castle this year, out in January! I hope the rest of January is mild enough for them.

I posted a similar photo on Instagram a few hours ago, just in case you’re getting a strange sense of déjà vu.

Aperture ƒ/8
Camera Canon EOS 6D
Focal length 45mm
ISO 320
Shutter speed 1/125s

Red Red Fruit

Red Red Fruit

Red fruit from a tree in the grounds of Blarney Castle. I have no idea what tree they come from as the name plate on the trunk is far below the wall where I photographed them.

I’ll update the post when I find out!

I found out that they’re called “Cornus kousa” thanks to Adam Whitburn who works in the gardens.

It’s Cornus kousa. Some people call it the Szechuan strawberry although it certainly doesn’t taste like one!

Aperture ƒ/2.2
Camera SM-G900F
Focal length 4.8mm
ISO 40
Shutter speed 1/35s

La Cueva de los Verdes

La Cueva de los Verdes

La Cueva de los Verdes is a seven kilometre long volcanic cave on the island of Lanzarote. One kilometre of it is open to the public and it’s amazing to visit. It was formed almost 5,000 years ago by lava that flowed from a volcano to the sea and it’s incredible to think of the forces and temperatures that formed the tunnel. This was my second visit to the cave. The first was with my wife, but this time my son went with me. He loved that he never had to duck down when walking through low passages! I looked forwards to taking this photo the whole day.

What’s really annoying however is tourists who don’t know how to use their cameras. A teenage girl with a DSLR stood next to me taking photos using the flash on her camera. I bet none of her photos captured the beautiful light show as the cavern was quite large and it was very dark. This photo was a 13 second exposure, at f/4.0, ISO 100. Luckily there was a particularly flat rock where I could rest my camera. Unfortunately for her she wasn’t speaking English but as I left I told another photographer to put his camera down in the same place and turn off the flash to get the best shot.

You can find more information on the cave here, here and of course on Wikipedia.

The Cueva de los Verdes stretches underground from the volcano known as “La Corona” through to the sea on the north east coast. The tunnel was blasted through the earth under the effect of exploding lava more than four millenia ago, rather like an enormous exhaust pipe.
Within recent years, the island government and the local authority of Haria have carried out extensive work on the cave, providing illumination, ambient music and safe pathways for the interested visitor. An hour–long guided tour covering more than two kilometres of underground exploration, includes an explanation of the legends of the cave, plus a sound and light show.

If you ever visit Lanzarote it’s definitely worth visiting!

PS. if you know the story behind this scene, keep it to yourself. Don’t spoil it for future visitors who might come by this post! :)

Aperture ƒ/4
Camera Canon EOS 6D
Focal length 17mm
ISO 100
Shutter speed 13s