The irony is lost on Paul

dodgy-souvenier-seller

It’s about time I posted this. Months ago this photo on Flickr was spammed by a company selling “all of categories for industries and life”.

I’m sure he never looked closely at the title of the image or translated it in to his local language.. :)

Flickr Support promptly removed this individual’s comment and replied,

Dear Sir:

I am a vice director of Flickr Report Abuse Co., Ltd to
supply all of categories for photo-sharing industries and
life.

I am content to contact you for deleting this business.

Joe

I had to read it twice, but cracked me up once I got it! :)

Photo Frame with Copyright Message in the GIMP

It’s about time I released this script. I announced last December I had written a script for the GIMP to create the border and copyright message seen on my photos here.

Previously I used a 704×490 empty image with the border and message (and a similar image for portrait shots). That was fine for uncropped images but if the width by height ratio was different I had to edit the frame and resize bits. Took ages.

This script creates a thin black border around the image, then adds a white border at the bottom. Finally the copyright text and url are printed in the white border.
Border and text sizes are hard coded but the script will work for any size image. Currently they’re more suitable for the web size images uploaded here.

Looking for the script? Download copyright-frame.scm and copy into .gimp-2.6/scripts/ and start GIMP. The script adds a menu item at “Image->Filters/Decor/Copyright Photo Frame…” The script is based on one written by Alexios Chouchoulas and distributed as part of the GIMP FX Foundary.

When you run the script the border and message is added without further interaction. A dialog to modify the hard coded size values isn’t really necessary because the images I upload are all around the same size. Clicking “OK” each time the script runs is hardly productive. If you want to modify the values, you’ll have to edit the script.
To change the size of the text, look for

(TextLayer (car (gimp-text-fontname inImage -1 (- theWidth 230) (- theHeight 18) “Donncha O Caoimh, http://inphotos.org/” 0 TRUE 11 PIXELS “Sans”)))

230: the number of pixels from the right where the message starts.
18: pixels from the bottom of the image where the top of the message hits.
11: size of the font used for the message.
Change the copyright message to suit your own circumstances.

To change the size of the white bottom border, look for the code (+ theHeight 23) and change 23.

If you use this script please link back here. I’d love to see what’s done with it!

Who gets the free prints?

A few days ago I offered visitors to my blog the chance to win free prints of any of my images. I’m very happy with the response. 27 entries but alas there can only be 2 winners.

So, who wins the free prints? I’m delighted to say that Claire gets the mounted print, and Debbie gets the laminated print. I’ll be in touch later to discuss what photo you want and sort out delivery details. Congratulations to both of you!

(And thank you Mark for helping me pick the winners!)

Bibble Pro and empty plugin dropdowns

After I reinstalled Ubuntu 8.10 I of course had to install some of the 3rd paty software I used before. One of those was Bibble Pro and I ran into a problem I experienced before. The drop down list boxes of Bibble plugins were empty!

I searched Google, and then the Bibble Labs forum, and found the answer, sort of. This is a Linux problem, as the permissions on the plugin files are too restrictive.
The paths are wrong in the commands given by afx however. Here’s how to fix the plugins. As root, type the following:

chmod ugo+rx /usr/lib/bibblelabs/bibblepro/plugins/*
chmod ugo+r /usr/lib/bibblelabs/bibblepro/tools/Plugins/*
chmod ugo+rx /usr/lib/bibblelabs/bibblepro/plugins /usr/lib/bibblelabs/bibblepro/tools/Plugins/

This is for future reference in case I get hit by this particular bug again!

How I backup my photos

I could go into some of the horror stories about photos I’ve lost or about how a disk crashed just before I copied the files off, but we’ve all been in that situation where we’ve lost important stuff when a disk decided to go belly up.
This might not be of much use to you if you don’t use Linux but bare with me. Some of the ideas might help keep your photos safe.

I use two Iomega 1TB external drives. They’re USB 2.0 drives so not the fastest things in the world but they do. The RAW files from the Canon 40D are noticeably slower loading obviously but not excessively so. Ironically, I bought a laptop because my desktop machine was so noisy, but the fans in those external drives are almost as noisy as my old computer!


Two external drives, earlier today.

Drive one is where I archive my photos for long term storage. Brand new, hot out of the camera photos are copied to the internal disk on my laptop but that only has 60GB free so I move photos manually every few months to Drive one. This drive is also where I store any other files, my music collection, videos I shoot. Anything really.

Drive two is my backup drive. I use Backuppc to do incremental backups every day. It backs up:

  1. All my websites through ssh.
  2. My home directory on my laptop with brand new photos, Thunderbird mail directory, Firefox and everything else.
  3. I used to backup my Macbook but that took too long over the local WiFi connection so I don’t keep anything irreplaceable on that.

What about backing up my photo archive on Drive one? Instead of Backuppc I use rsync to copy the first drive to the second one every night. This command, placed in /etc/cron.daily/backup (and made executable with chmod a+x backup) will do the trick. It copies any new or modified files from disk one to my backup disk.

rsync -a /media/one/ /media/backup/

I use rsync because it’s simpler than Backuppc and I don’t need incremental backups of the data there. Any photos that are modified are copied to new files anyway, rendering increments useless. Rsync is also available on Mac OS X, and there’s also Unison that runs on Linux, Mac OS X and Windows and does the same job.

Backuppc can be installed from rpm or on Debian based systems using apt-get or aptitude. It’s a Unix based backup solution but can backup systems running many other operating systems such as Windows and Mac OS X. It has a simple to use web gui for administering backups. The only downside is configuration which can be daunting as it requires editing of config files and setting up remote hosts if necessary. On the up side, there’s plenty of documenation and it’s well worth trying if you want an automated system you can trust.

Disk capacity is another issue, but as I store all my files in dated folders my photo archive only grows in one area: the folder for the current year. If I run out of disk space I’ll buy another disk or replace an existing drive with a larger one. I could go down the RAID or LVM route but I don’t want to complicate things. If my current drives last that long, I’ll replace both after 2 years. Disks always break sooner or later.

So how do you backup your photos? If you’ve blogged about it, please leave a link to the post. I’m always trying to improve my own system!

Aperture ƒ/5.6
Camera Canon EOS 40D
Focal length 72mm
ISO 400
Shutter speed 1/60s

The Curves Tool

The curves tool is a very basic tool that can be used to improve photos with a few clicks of the mouse. It is used to change the brightness and contrast of an image. It can also modify the separate Red, Green and Blue channels of an image too. The Curves Tool has a histogram to represent the shadow, midtone and highlight detail in the image. In the GIMP, you access it by right clicking on an image and go to Colors->Curves.

This is the second article in my GIMP for Photographers series, but as usual, all of this applies to Photoshop, or any other image application with a Curves Tool. The first tutorial was on The Levels Tool, and worth a read if you missed it!

Here’s an image I shot at the Lord Mayor’s Picnic in Fitzgerald’s Park a few months ago, and the Curve Tool below it. Notice the histogram? The photo is fairly well exposed, but some highlights are “clipped”, as the histogram hits right hand side without sloping off.


Brightening Curve

It’s easy to brighten an image. Just drag points on the line up.


Darkening Curve

Now, let’s darken the image by dragging points down.


Contrast Curve

A classic use of the Curves Tool is to increase contrast in an image. You do this by darkening the shadows, and brightening the highlights. The curve looks sort of like an “S” when you do this. Don’t go overboard on this though, because it’s easy to lose detail in either direction.


If for some reason your image has too much contrast, a quick inverted S curve will solve that problem,


Wacky Colours

You can select any of the Red, Green and Blue channels and do strange things to your photos. Here’s what happens when you play with the Red Channel.


And here’s what happens when you change multiple colour channels in different ways.

Colour Picker

After you have opened the Curves Tool, click anywhere in the image. Notice how a vertical line goes up and down the histogram/line? That vertical line is the colour of the pixel where you clicked. That can be useful if you’re trying to modify a particular part of a photo. This is what you get when you click on the black coat on the left of the image above.

Aperture ƒ/6.3
Camera Canon EOS 20D
Focal length 18mm
ISO 200
Shutter speed 1/250s

What! The Canon EOS 50D announced already?

Yes, yes, boo hoo, oh woe is me, my Canon 40D arrived on the day the new Canon 50D was announced. If only I had waited, my photos would be so much better with the Canon 50D.

Yeah right. I’ve already stated before that the equipment behind the camera is the most important part of image making. Sure, the camera does matter, but DSLRs are getting to the stage PCs got to a few years ago. Upgrading doesn’t significantly change the game. I’ll upgrade again in maybe 3 years. No rush.

The Canon 50D looks sweet though. 15MP sensor, better ISO, better LCD. Nice upgrade. Roland has linked to a few of the sites previewing or discussing the Canon 50D. The Rob Galbraith page is probably the most readable, but the DPReview preview has a neat comparison table to compare the Canon 50D with the Canon 40D.

DIGIC 4 processor Canon’s next-generation, 14-bit DIGIC 4 processor see its debut in the 50D, and it offers both more functionality and about 30% faster processing speed than the DIGIC III processor in the 40D….

The two cameras’ dimensions, body style and control positions are also the same (though the 50D is fractionally lighter). In a nutshell, the 50D appears to be a 40D with a higher-resolution sensor, revamped image processing, faster CompactFlash write speeds, HDMI video out and a crisp new rear LCD.


Love this pic of the motherboard with the DIGIC 4 processor!