The most sent around duck photo

I would love to know who made an email attachment of my thieving duck and thank them. The Aflac Duck seems to be a well known part of American insurance marketing and people got a kick out of these ducks stealing money from a lady on the street!

Apparently my thieving duck has become “the most sent-around-ha-ha-look-at-the-duck photo evar” but I wish I had watermarked the image with my blog url. It has appeared on:

To those that linked back here, thank you. To the rest, shame on you, why didn’t you use Google and find my blog?

I’m still chuffed that an image of mine is now an “urban legand” of sorts. Not many can say that! More comments on flickr but please link here if you’re going to link anywhere!

Update – welcome visitors from the Zefrank forum!

Update on June 14th. It appears the News of the World newspaper used the Thieving Duck last Sunday. I sent them off an email this afternoon so hopefully I will hear from them within a day or two.

Clearing out my feed reader

My feed addiction has got to stop! It’s a great way to keep up to date on my favourite blogs but when it gets to over 300 blogs then something has to be done. That means cutting back on my subscriptions. Unfortunately the first to go will be those photoblogs that don’t offer a full feed, or only show thumbnails. If I had time, I’d visit your blog every day but I don’t, and it’s impossible to judge the merits of a photo from a tiny thumbprint of an image.

Without further ado, here’s the list of blogs I have dropped from my feed reader. If you’ve come here because you saw traffic to your blog through a link in this post, please consider a full feed. I’d be back like a shot because I enjoyed your photography enough to subscribe in the first place!

Your feed readers are the most loyal of your readers and they should be treated accordingly. Give them something to get their teeth into instead of a small morsel and you’ll find that traffic to your blog increases, you’ll get more links to your posts and maybe even more comments by an appreciative audience.

Here are the photography related blogs that stay.

And a lot more but I got tired of copy/pasting everything.

Coming up on Monday: search engine tips for your photoblog. Don’t miss it!

Poster size prints only 9.99

Turkish Trabordine only 19.99! Where’s that Muunkaay!

No, Daft Dave hasn’t invaded the blogosphere yet, but until the 31st of March Photobox.ie are offering poster size prints for only €9.99 which seems like quite a good deal. I’m ordering a few prints off them to see what the quality is like but I’ve ordered before and been happy with the results so hopefully they won’t disappoint.

Give tired rooms a stunning makeover by creating a feature wall with poster prints. Why not try using interesting crops to create a series of prints – as A3, 16″x12″, 18″x12″, 20″x16″ A2 and 30″x20″ size prints are just €9.99 each! Just enter offer code CREATEWALLARTIE at the checkout. The only limit is your creativity!

Shorpy’s 100 year old photoblog

Someday the photos being posted today will look antiquated and some may be studied by historians but we can do the same now thanks to the efforts of Shorpy. All the photos on this blog are from 100 years ago, at the start of the 20th century and offer a glimpse into a very different time. They’re super, I’m hooked and subscribed already!

Two years ago I posted two pictures comparing a street scene in Cork in 1930 against the same one in 2005. I keep meaning to do more of them but as the old images are still copyrighted I need to ask permission first. Cork Past and Present is an excellent collection of images from the past that is a wonderful resource to compare what the city looked like with what it is now. I might try some more old and new photos linking to pages on that site.

Are there any other old photo sites or blogs out there? (via)

The 300 Effect

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300 hasn’t made it to Ireland yet but I started seeing blogs talking about it yesterday. Most are reviewing it but Photocritic looked at recreating the same style of photography that appears in the film with the help of graphic artist Jason Niedle.

Last week’s Time magazine has a two page spread on the movie. It was interesting to read that because of the high tech CGI used in the film, the only “real” things in the movie were the actors and little else. They had to use their initiative too as the film was almost completely shot inside a studio against a blue screen. I’m looking forward to seeing it!

The trivia page is full of interesting, err, trivia. Yay, they used Linux too!

Ten visual effects vendors contributed to the film, spread over three continents.

The filmmakers used bluescreen 90% of the time, and greenscreen for 10%. They chose blue because it better matched the lighting paradigm (green would have been too bright) and because red garments (a la spartan capes) look better when shot over blue.

There was one day of location shooting, which was for the horses that were shot for the ‘approaching sparta’ scene.

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Two very different reviews of the movie: The Star offers a serious look at brutal Spartan society while Kevin Costello says, “I’m not nearly as straight as I often claim” after watching all the bare male skin and asking, “Is there any man in this film with less than a washboard stomach?”