The Grand Parade Cannon

The Grand Parade Cannon

This unusual lump of metal sticking out of the pavement on the Grand Parade could be the oldest street furniture in the city. I had forgotten I had posted this photo way back in 2007 but I prefer this version of the photo as it has more detail.

What do you think? Which photo is better, colour or black and white?

I think it’s fascinating that a cannon is embedded in the ground there but when I last posted about it I wasn’t sure if it was one. Take a look at this page where there’s a picture of the cannon with the surrounding earth dug up.

The cannon’s trunnion, consisting of two cylinders of solid metal projecting from each side and designed to support the gun in place on a gun carriage, is immediately below the present ground level

There’s also this page where there’s an interesting description of what the street was like hundreds of years ago. It’s hard to believe there was a bridge across a water channel that was the Grand Parade from Tuckey Street to Oliver Plunkett Street!

This will change everything

This will change everything

“This will change everything he thought”. Err, no. It won’t.

Billboards like this sprang up near the Elysian in Cork in 2007 and later as construction of that building continued. Well. It didn’t change anything except that the country went into recession and the building is mostly empty even now.

Some nice photos here from when they had an open day in late 2008.

Shandon Bells from Afar

Shandon Bells from Afar

The steeple of St. Anne’s Church towers over the surrounding streets as seen from Coburg Street, Cork last night.

I laboured over this photo. I could not get the shade and colour of the houses in the middle-background right for quite a while. Sometimes it was too bright, or too blue, or too dark, or just not right. Only after I left it for a few hours and came back did I recreate what I saw last night.

The Bandon Road Roundabout, pre-flyover

The Bandon Road Roundabout

The flyover over the Bandon Road Roundabout in Bishopstown is completed (or so I’ve read, I haven’t driven over it yet) but here’s what it looked like 2006, well before any work was done. The pedestrian walkway I took this from is long gone and the area itself looks a lot different now!

Now, all we need is a north-south road with a 100kph speed limit and we’re all sorted.

Further info on and Evening Echo and here too.

A NEW era of motoring in Cork dawned today as the city’s new 60 million twin flyovers opened to traffic on the South Ring Road.
Traffic travelling both east and west on the N25 were directed on to the new flyovers at the Sarsfield Road and Bandon Road roundabouts from 6am this morning.
Up to 60,000 vehicles every day will now be taken off the two roundabouts, vastly reducing traffic congestion in the Bishopstown and Wilton areas.
Travel times are also expected to be cut by up to 30 minutes at peak traffic periods with the opening of the flyovers which took two years to complete.

Aperture ƒ/22
Camera Canon EOS 20D
Focal length 10mm
ISO 200
Shutter speed 1/20s

St Patrick’s Bridge

St Patrick's Bridge

St Patrick’s Bridge in Cork spans the River Lee at the top of St Patrick’s Street and leads on to Bridge Street on the northern bank of the river. Here it is on a particularly cloudy day a few days ago!

More information on the bridge can be found here.

World War One Lee Enfield Rifle

World War 1 Lee Enfield

The remains of a World War One Lee Enfield rifle found somewhere in France or Belgium. It’s heavily corroded and the wood used in it’s construction is almost completely gone. I dread to think what action it saw or what happened to it’s owner.

This was on display at the military show in Cork City Gaol today. I took many more photos but I chose to post this one because the Lee Enfield will be well known to many gamers. If you’ve played Red Orchestra 2 you have definitely used it.
I also chose it because of my reawakened interest in history. Check out r/AskHistorians where there are always interesting answers and specific to this picture, there’s r/WWI. I also started listening to IWM Voices of the First World War podcast. Listening and reading about a subject is one thing but to see artefacts from the period is another.

The Wikipedia page for the Lee Enfield rifle is well worth a read.