Cobh Boats

I would hazard a guess that these boats are a semi-permanent feature of the Cobh seafront as they’re berthed there each time I have visited!
I love the cobbles of the slipway, and the way the water catches theevening light.

Looks like I’m not the only photoblogger to visit Lanzarote recently!

Seaweed rope

I like the dreamy diffused glow of this image. It was shot down in Inchadony Beach a few weeks back.

Howto: First of all, I had to straighten the horizon because it was at a precarious angle. I used two layers, I saturated the colours slightly in the bottom layer to bring out the green of the sea weed.
I blurred the top layer and converted it to black and white using the channel mixer. I applied a layer mask of a gradient to make the bottom half of the lower layer visible and changed layer mode to screen with an opacity of 100.
I then corrected lens distortion using ptlens running in Wine. The horizon was noticeably bent but this program did a great job correcting that!

On the beach at Youghal

Last weekend we visited Youghal in Co. Cork. I haven’t been on the beach there for years and I had quite forgotten how big it is! It was nice for a walk, but we were frozen from the cold wind.
I was just in town. Big Brother were supposed to hold auditions from 9am on the Grand Parade but there was no sign of them. Still, I used the opportunity to buy flowers and they went down very well with Jacinta! :)

Glendalough Bridge

We spent last weekend driving – up to Bray in Co. Wicklow, visited Glendalough, The Sally Gap and promptly got lost a few times on the way to Avoca!
On Sunday we returned to Cork, but took a detour via Tullow and Carlow to visit Killkenny. We called to friends in Fermoy and arrived home late last night.
The N11 on the east coast is very impressive! Getting to Killkenny from Bray is a chore however. There are only secondary roads the whole way, but the scenery is amazing and we saw bits of the country we hadn’t been to before!
This is the first photo from that trip taken at Glendalough.
The round tower in the background was built sometime between the 8th and 12th centuries. Round Towers were built to protect monastic scriptures, gold and property from Viking raiders. The only entrance is far off the ground, and easily defended.