I can hardly see myself

As I said previously, thick fog was rolling across the Conor Pass. It was frightening how fast it moved and the light and scene changed utterly.

Here’s it’s obscuring the road down the Pass, making the too-narrow road even more treacherous. I think by the time we left, even this stretch of road and the car park was covered in a thick white fog.

Don’t forget! If you’re around Cork on March 9th, head to the Lough for 3pm. I’m planning a photowalk around The Lough and all are welcome!

Clouds over the Conor Pass

I’m loath to post photos from the same location day after day but I may as well call this “Conor Pass Week” and get the rest of them out of the dark where they’ve languished since 2006.

After the reaction to yesterday’s Conor Pass photo hopefully you’ll like this one too.

I have another 2 or 3 taken at the same time. The day was perfect for photography, the light was strong and to the side, there was an interesting sky and of course the scenery is beautiful. That was a very successful trip!

Windswept grass and fence

The tough grass by a beach in Kerry grows thick on this hill, bounded by a wire fence to keep curious people like myself at bay!

This is an experiment for me. I thought the b/w treatment would work well as the image is full of texture, lines and shadow. What do you think? Another similar one to follow tomorrow.

An Fear Marbh

An Fear Marbh, an island off the coast of Co. Kerry, Ireland, with the setting sun lighting up the cloud over the Atlantic.

“An Fear Marbh” translates as “the dead man” and is so named because of the obvious shape of the island – that of a man lying on his back.
This was taken last September but because today is the Winter Solstice, and the shortest day of the year, I thought it was the perfect image for the day. Days will get longer now, little by little each day.

On the day this was taken we had dinner in Dingle. I watched the sun set and the light travel down the mountains near the Conor Pass. After eating, we quickly drove west to the coast to watch the sunset. Driving down a small road we spotted a car pulled over and someone standing outside watching the sunset so we stopped and got out. Turns out it was another photographer shooting the setting sun! We stayed there chatting for a few minutes before heading off. A few moments later the road turned a corner and this beautiful scene presented itself. I had to stop and shoot a few dozen shots.

Last night we called to the crib in Ballyvolane. Fr. James McSweeney has put together a wonderful crib with chickens, pigs, calves, goats, sheep, lammas, a pony, 2 donkeys and 4 young puppies. I’ll post a photo or two tomorrow, and the crib is definitely worth a visit if you live in Cork.
Visitors are asked to give a donation, and this year money raised will go to the St Patrick’s Church renovation fund. The crib is located 200 metres from St Oliver’s Church in Ballyvolane on Kilmorna Heights.
Fr. James has a photography site at Today is my gift to you.ie where he posts a new photo every day. I’ll be converting it to a WordPress blog in January when things quieten down again!

The lone daisy

A solitary daisy grows in front of a small house in Fountainstown.

This was an interesting photo for me to take. I spotted the daisy while walking out the road but I didn’t stop to shoot it until returning. I’m glad I remembered it! I’m really happy with the way this came out.