The streets of San Francisco

San Francisco is rightly famous for it’s hills and steep slopes. The city streets go up and down and, and no matter what the gradient, cars will always be parked at the side of the street. Local bylaws state that a parked car on a slope must have the front wheels pointed towards the sidewalk so the car won’t roll if the handbrake fails. As you can see, not everyone obeys that particular piece of legislation!

I can’t remember what building this was, but I was struck by the sheer lines of it, and the grey gloomy and despondent colour. There are no entrances visible and the building seems to grow out of the hillside as if mocking the gradient of the land by standing tall and straight.

PS. Happy Thanksgiving! It’s a normal working day around the rest of the world but the Internet is much quieter now that US visitors are off work, relaxing and enjoying the day!

Lady at the lights

If looks could kill! I don’t know who she was looking at but she doesn’t look happy!

Pictured on the corner of Washington Street and Grand Parade a few days ago while we waited for the traffic lights to change. Finn’s Corner, a sports clothes shop, has been on that corner for years and St. Augustine’s Catholic Church is visible just down the road. I’ve never been in that church despite it’s central location. It’s so well integrated into the street scape that it’s easy to forget it’s there.

Get There, Go Anywhere

Bicycle locked up and bus arriving on the Grand Parade a few nights ago.
It’s been quite a while since I used either forms of transport.
What caught your eye first about this image? The poster, the foreground or the bus?

The Signs in Blarney

The signs in Blarney always point towards a B&B!
This bunch of signs do anyway. Right at the end of Station Road there’s a pole with signs to about a dozen B&Bs! If you ever need somewhere to stay in Blarney you shouldn’t have trouble finding accomodation!

Link of the Day

If you haven’t read any of the The Digital Journalist yet then the January issue is a good place to start! I found dispatches for Iraq and Bolivia rivetting and scary and exciting.
In a compeltely different way, Bill Pierce’s memories of the late Michael Evans will stir your heart. He did a great job writing about his friend.