Warning sign in the wilderness

Warning sign in the wilderness

Another shot of the Electric Wires warning sign I posted yesterday. This one gives you a flavour of the landscape in the area, and the desolate, remote location of the sign.

Aperture ƒ/8
Camera Canon EOS 40D
Focal length 125mm
ISO 100
Shutter speed 1/200s

Electric Wires

Electric Wires

If you’ve ever taken the Naomh Ciaran II to Cape Clear Island this sign will be familiar to you.

WARNING
ELECTRIC WIRES
60 FT (18 Mtrs)
OVER HIGH
WATER LEVEL

PS. The cheezburger are the latest blog to use the Thieving Duck. Hope they link back to the original post.
PPS. They did, saw a trickle of hits from there.

Aperture ƒ/8
Camera Canon EOS 40D
Focal length 200mm
ISO 100
Shutter speed 1/160s

Naomh Ciaran II

Naomh Ciaran II

Naomh Ciaran II, the Cape Clear Ferry for many a year is still going strong. Here she is tied up at the pier in Baltimore, Co Cork, Ireland. The last time I boarded her (probably 15 years ago) and travelled to Oilean Cleire she was painted green and white, but it seems she has had an eventful history since then.

Traditionally, for many years up to 2001, the provision of a ferry service to Cape Clear Island was handled directly by the State. The State (The Department of the Gaeltacht) owned the vessels that were in use – Oileán na nÉan and the Naomh Ciarán II. The service was managed by a committee that comprised representatives of Cape Clear Island and the Department of the Gaeltacht.
In 2001, a decision was made to transfer the service to a private company – Naomh Ciarán II Oileán Chléire Teo – that had been established by the skipper of the service. A contract was agreed with this company and, as part of that contract, it was agreed that the State (The Department of Arts, Heritage, Gaeltacht and the Islands) would lease the vessel, the Naomh Ciarán II, to the company and pay an annual subsidy of €104,126 for a period of 5 years, from June 2001 to June 2006.
As part of that arrangement, and under the terms of the contract agreed, the State made redundancy payments of €190,691 to the four crew members who were employed by the company before the transfer.
Unfortunately, the new company’s principal, who was skipper of the ferry service, died suddenly during the term of the contract. Comharchumann Chlére bought the company and continued to run the ferry service under the contract that was in effect

Aperture ƒ/8
Camera Canon EOS 40D
Focal length 10mm
ISO 100
Shutter speed 1/125s

Mulroy Bay II

Mulroy Bay II

Mulroy Bay II, one of two trawlers abandoned in the waters near Baltimore town in Co Cork, Ireland. Shot from Tullagh Cemetery.

PS. Calvin took a few nights shots of the Mulroy Bay II a few days ago when local artist Sheelagh Broderick and others lit up the vessel with high powered lanterns.

Aperture ƒ/40
Camera Canon EOS 40D
Focal length 200mm
ISO 100
Shutter speed 1/6s

Tullagh Cemetery at Sunset

Tullagh Cemetery at Sunset

Tullagh Cemetery in Baltimore, Co Cork, Ireland is just a field away from the excellent Casey’s Hotel where we spent the last week. I went down there one evening to shoot a couple of half capsized trawlers in the bay when I turned around and saw some of the headstones silhouetted against the setting sun.

I went searching online and found that 3 Commonwealth burials of the 1914-1918 war were in this graveyard.

Aperture ƒ/11
Camera Canon EOS 40D
Focal length 59mm
ISO 100
Shutter speed 1/640s

Tall trees in Oracle

Tall trees in Oracle

These tall evergreens planted in front of a set of small houses in Oracle were almost gone before I saw them. The scene looked bizarre. Tall trees, tiny houses. I wonder who lives in them?

Here it is on Google Maps. Try the Street View, you’ll see two cars pulled up in front of the same house as in my photo. Spooky.

Aperture ƒ/6.3
Camera Canon EOS 20D
Focal length 10mm
ISO 100
Shutter speed 1/100s