Light trails on Oliver Plunkett Street

Light trails from a passing car leave their mark on this long exposure shot of Oliver Plunkett Street in Cork.

Can you see pink lights on the vertical poles standing at the edge of the pavement? On my Linux box they’re clear as day but I can’t see them at all in Preview on the Macbook.

The lights were designed and made by MAAS here in Cork and the colour changes slowly from blues to purples to pinks to yellow and to any other colour. It’s quite a sight to see the colour change when standing at one end of this long straight street!

Royal purple cider

After a particularly grueling few hours traipsing around the shops in Cork I was on my way to Vibes and Scribes in Bridge Street when I spotted an empty can of Bulmers in front of the purple doors of an old building on Camden Place. In fact it’s the front door of the Cork Rape Crisis Centre. Obviously a drunk had taken shelter in the doorway the previous night.

Yes, that’s my shadow in the door!
PS. thank you so much for the comments yesterday. Rest assured, the donkey will be returning to a screen near you!

Pedestrian Zone

Many of the side streets off St. Patrick’s Street in Cork are now pedestrian zones. In fact, Oliver Plunkett Street is closed off to traffic on Saturdays too which is great for shoppers.

Check out Donal’s latest photos from his trip to Lesotho. The second group portrait is particularly good!

Pathway to Gallarus

If you visit the Dingle Peninsula you must visit the Gallarus Oratory. It’s an early Christian church, possibly built in the 6th century. There is a visitor centre but don’t be fooled into paying the entrance fee. The building is a national monument and the public have a right to see it. Your entrance fee does pay for a crummy video in a dark and musty room but to be honest it’s not worth it! Continue up the road and you’ll find a path leading directly to the church.
Your taxes pay for the upkeep of the building so why pay another charge to see it?

Barbara Jessie Burton 1927

This foundation stone is set into a building at one end of Princes Street, Cork. I never noticed it until the day I took this photo and a quick search for Barbara Jessie Burton returns information and pictures of foundation stones laid by her in the years following 1927:

Does anyone know anything else about Barbara Jessie Burton?

JCB on the street

A JCB helps to dig up the Grand Parade in Cork. This was shot last September and like the previous couple of shots, this street is completely different now. It’s looking well, although the fancy stonework is begining to lose it’s shine. The chewing gum is sticking, and the fumes of a living city blacken and dirty the white and red stone of the surface.

Still, it looked nice when it was completed. They’re just finishing off bits of the Grand Parade now so it’s interesting to see the difference between the new surface and the older.