Posts By Donncha

Waves crash at Garretstown

Waves crash onto the beach at Garretstown last April.

Ryan has put his photos of the Irish Blog Awards online. Great shots!

Rusted, old and bent

This is part of another pillar near the one pictured yesterday but in much worse condition.

I love the textures and the way that rust practically flows down. It’s a shame I didn’t get everything in focus though.

I figured out why my posts started showing “This photo is currently unavailable”. On March 1st Flickr changed the way they name their images. Previously it was only a matter of changing _m.jpg to _o.jpg to get the original image, or swapping in “_s.jpg” to get a small thumbnail. Now the numbers in the filename change as well.

It’s a simple but tedious task to change the image before I publish a post but the thumbnails you see at the top of this page are generated by a small script which now needs to be rewritten and made a lot smarter.

Standing free

Shot down in Garretstown Beach last year. Connectivity continues to be a problem so this will be short.

The Importance of Being Earnest

I wasn’t sure what to expect when I decided to take in a bit of culture and go see “The Importance of Being Earnest” performed by Chattyboo Productions at Cork Arts Theatre. Frank Prendergast has a leading role in the play and he blogged about it a few days ago, but I didn’t know anything about Oscar Wilde. I expected a stuffy Victorian period drama along the lines of many popular movies I’ve seen. Little did I know the comedic gem that was lying in wait.

I won’t give anything away about the story, except to say that it has a perfect mix of love, humour, twists and scoundrels. We spent the whole time either laughing or engrossed in the twists and characters of the plot.

Unfortunately the play finishes on Saturday so you only have a few more days to enjoy this wonderful experience! Check out Frank’s post for an audio clip, and go book your tickets by ringing the Cork Arts Theatre at 021-4505624.

Lots more photos after the jump…

Chris 64

The crowds watch a festival in Union Square, San Francisco. I’m not sure who Chris is but I’m guessing he’s a rugby player?

Hmm, Flickr are still mangling the image URL. I hope they fix it soon.

Fianna Fail in Cork

Fianna Fail, “The Republican Party”, had an office on the Grand Parade in Cork for years. Last time I looked the building was derelict. Anyone want to compare the state of their Cork office to their policies or chances in the next election?

Fianna Fail have been in power almost continuously for as long as I remember and before that of course. Will you vote for them?

This is next door to no 48 pictured yesterday.

I like this: May Day in California. Great street shots.

The red door at No. 48

No. 48 on Grand Parade Cork is an old disused building near the Goat Broke Loose. It’s also next door to the old location of Fianna Fail’s Cork office.

The soaking wet happy springer spaniel

This is another photo of Ruby, a springer spaniel that lives in Myrtleville. This time she followed us over to Fennell’s Bay where she dashed off into the shallows after stones. She was deliriously happy!

Unfortunately the same could not be said for a group of teenagers higher up on the beach who threw stones at us and into the water very close to us. Their malevolent laughter spoiled that moment for us and put us in real danger. They weren’t locals and by their accents it wasn’t hard to figure out where in Cork they were from.

There’s more of Ruby here and here. We were down in Myrtleville last weekend and didn’t see her at all. I hope she’s ok and was tucked up at home in front of the fire instead of at a cold and wet beach.

Congratulations to Gavin@Headphoneland for winning best photoblog at last night’s Irish Blog Awards! Get well soon!

There’s definitely something up with Flickr’s “Blog This” function. The URL of the image it passed to my blog was borked and displayed the infamous, “This photo is currently unavailable”. I reported it yesterday but I guess it’ll take longer than that to fix.

The ever vexxing question of privacy arrises on Kevin’s blog here and here. In the USA it’s perfectly ok to use someone’s image for non commercial usage as long as the photo was taken in a public place. I can understand why that woman is suing Yahoo! but I guess it’s the money she wants rather than protecting her privacy. (Is there a difference?) I covered the issue in the past, where things could be a little different in Ireland – the expectation of privacy extends to a private conversation in a public place. Vexxing indeed!

The Digital Photography Show interviewed Bert Krages, the author of the PDF, The Photographer’s Right on the subject of photographer’s rights. I haven’t listened yet but it should be good as he knows his stuff. Obviously laws will change from place to place so do some research locally before shooting on the street! The interview is also mentioned here and here.

How to photograph a lunar eclipse

2005-11-19_mg_5765-m.jpg

Tonight the moon will be eclipsed by the Earth which will turn it red for a few hours from about 10:44pm. I’ll be outside with my 20D and a Canon 75-300mm zoom hoping to grab a few shots, but first it’s important to know a few things:

  • The moon shines by reflecting light from the Sun and the Earth, it’s bright.
  • The night sky is dark which will fool camera sensors.
  • All celestial bodies are in motion. You won’t see it from moment to moment with your eyes of course but even a 1 second exposure of the night sky will produce an image that captures that movement.

What can you do? When photographing the moon normally, you expose as if you were shooting at midday on a bright sunlit day. The eclipsed moon isn’t as bright though. If you can, shoot in manual mode. Open your aperture as wide as possible on your lens (smaller f numbers), and take a few shots with different speeds. That’s called bracketing and is really easy and inexpensive with digital. Use the LCD screen on your camera and most importantly the histogram function – that will tell you if your image is exposed properly.

With my lens zoomed in it opens to f5.6, and I found that an exposure of 1/125sec gives a slightly underexposed shot of the moon. Start around there and work your way up and down the exposure times. If you’re using a digital camera it’s costing you nothing.

As you’ll be using a zoom lens, make sure that you have a tripod handy. It also helps to have a cable release too, but if not, use your camera’s timer function to reduce shake.

Here’s an excellent guide to shooting the moon. That guide recommends the “sunny 16” rule. Shoot at f/16 and bracket from there, but the eclipsed moon is much dimmer than a full moon. If you search around there’s a wealth of information online about photographing the moon. Good luck!

The picture above was shot on November 19th, 2005, colour corrected and sharpened but not resized. That’s about as big as a 300mm lens on a Canon 20D will do without extra magnification. It’s getting foggy outside. I hope it clears in the next hour!